Tech history

  • March 26, 1976: Altair Computer Convention
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 26, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1976 – The First Annual World Altair Computer Convention is held at the Airport Marina Hotel near Albuquerque, New Mexico. Bill Gates opens the convention with his position on software piracy. Of course, it was all about the Altair 8800. MITS (Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems) was a computer that came in kit form where you could build and improve upon it. Tablet PC Initiative Kevin Mitnick pleads guilty Dr. Who comes back out of mothballs. […]

  • March 25, 1994: Microsoft Excel 4.0
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 25, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1994 – Microsoft released Excel 4.0. It included an Easter egg animation of the Excel logo crushing the numbers 1-2-3. Other Day in Tech History items: AOL and eBay cross marketing agreement Excel 4.0 is released The first Computers Freedom and Privacy Conferenc […]

  • March 24, 1802: The Puffing Devil Steam Engine Patent
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 24, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1802 – A patent for the first steam engine was issued to Richard Trevithick and Andrew Viviane. The machine was called the “Puffing Devil” or “Puffer”. The engine could produce 145 psi to push the car forward. Richard had two versions of the engine – one as a car and the other as a locomotive. The car was first demonstrated on December 24, 1801, unfortunately, the puffer engine suffered catastrophic failure as it overheated and caught fire. Eventually in 1804, Trevithick’s patent gave way to the first locomotive where he pulled ten cars along a track. He continued his work until... […]

  • March 23, 2001: Mir Crashes Down in Deorbit
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 23, 2019 at 2:00 am

    2001 – It’s called the “Deorbit” – Space Station Mir was a controlled re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere. Ultimately, the space station burned up over the ocean by New Zeland. Some parts of Mir could survive the re-entry process, so putting the ship over a large body of water was the best way to reduce casulties. Still, New Zeland was at full alert if winds brought large pieces inland. The official statement had Mir at complete Deorbit around 5:59:24 GMT. Cold Fusion is achieved Game Boy Advance SP Microsoft closes Omniture Analytics. […]

  • March 22, 1981: RCA Selectavision Videodisc
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 22, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1981 – The first vinyl video record, a.k.a. the videodisc, hit stores in the U.S. The “Capacitance Electronic Disc” looked just like any other vinyl record protected in a plastic caddy and held 60 minutes of NTSC video. That is approximately 27,000 frames per second. However, the CED players did not make the impact RCA had hoped. Only 100,000 were sold by the end of the year. The “BetaMax vs. VHS” war was in full swing and the tapes were considerably smaller than the discs. Laserdisc was also available to the public, which led to a lot of confusion of formats.... […]

  • March 21, 2006: The First Tweet and Twitter is Founded
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 21, 2019 at 2:00 am

    2006 – Jack Dorsey, Evan Williams, Biz Stone and Noah Glass launch Twitter (a.k.a. Twttr) with Jack’s first Tweet. “Just setting up my Twttr” went across the network of only a few followers. Similar to Alexander Graham Bell’s “Mr. Watson, come here” statement or “Mary Had a Little Lamb” into a wax cylinder. Twitter was officially founded, but still in beta. The group at first didn’t acquire the highly priced “Twitter.com” until they had a proof of concept. Six months in, Twttr needed their “i” and “e”. Hfury Apple TV begins Shipping […]

  • March 20, 1916: The Foundation of the General Theory of Relativity
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 20, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1916 – Albert Einstein sent a paper off to Annelen Der Physik. The paper was called “Die Grundlage der Allgemeinen Relativitatstheorie” – translated as “The Foundation of the General Theory of Relativity”. The paper included the Principle considerations about the Postulate of Relativity, Mathmatical auxiliiaries for establishing the general covariant equations, theory of gravitational fields, and Newton’s theory as first approximation. For years thereafter, people studied this theory and tried to prove or disprove it. Google Chome adds RSS support 3-COM exit strategy of high-end data networking Apple 20th Anniversary Macintosh (TAM) […]

  • March 19, 1997: First Consumer DVD Player Released in U.S.
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 19, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1997 – Toshiba – a member of the DVD consortium – put out the first consumer DVD player on November 1, 1996 in Japan as the SD-3000. After some initial changes (and having to change the DVD region code for U.S. based DVD players), Toshiba debuted two U.S. models – the SD-2006 and the SD-3006. The SD-3006 had two more analog outputs and a Y-Cr-Cb video out with selector. Both players could run in 16:9 or 4:3 mode, but had to be selected when not in use.  The SD-2006 sold for $599 and the SD-3006 sold for $699. There are questions... […]

  • March 18, 2008: LimeWire Tries to go Legal
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 18, 2019 at 2:00 am

    2008 – The free peer-to-peer file sharing program who was under major fire decided to set up a fully legal DRM music store. With over 500,000 MP3’s from artists who are not on any major labels, the store allowed you to get lossless versions of this music.  They planned a party at SXSW 2008 . Downloads were on a pay-per-track pricing – from 30 cents (on up) per song. There were no mention of  how much an artist could get from those prices. The RIAA was still going after the software itself at this point. Ultimately on October 2010, an injunction... […]

  • March 17, 1988: Apple Sues Microsoft, HP over GUI
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 17, 2019 at 2:00 am

    Happy St. Patrick’s Day! 1988 – The Graphical User Interface (GUI) is what we use daily to open up email, our web browser and even those apps on your smartphone or tablet. With the first real GUI came the first copyright infringement for it as Apple sued both Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard for stealing features from Macintosh’s interface. Hewlett Packard was also named for their New Wave desktop environment. Missing from the suit is Microsoft Presentation Manager, which became the interface for IBM’s OS/2. The lawsuit got muddied when Xerox sued Apple for the same thing. That instance got thrown out rather... […]

  • March 16, 1926: First Liquid-Fueled Rocket Launched
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 16, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1926 – Robert Goddard became the first man to launch liquid-fueled rocket. The liquid oxygen and gasoline mixture launched the 10 foot rocket, travelling at 60 MPH, to an altitude of 41 feet. The rocket was dubbed “Nell” and was launched in the cold climate in Auburn Massachusetts. The New York Times picked up on Goddard’s experiment, but wasn’t kind to him. They denounced his work, ultimately swaying public opinion. An unwavered Goddard put together a team and in 1930 continued his research. He made some great strides until 1945 when he passed away. His work and 214 patents gave way for scientists... […]

  • March 15, 1989: Amiga Plus Magazine
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 15, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1989 – Antic Software publishes the first issue of Amiga Plus Magazine. It was the April/May edition and included an AMIGA Plus disk, which included the graphic programs created. Articles included everything from creating graphics, to your 1988 Federal Income Tax, Lattice C++ review to a Tetris review and more. Nat Friedland was the Editor and Arnie Cachelin the assistant editor. The Magazine had a short life – closing its doors in 1991. IBM 1050 Data Communications System First Unix manual page for cc Cisco acquires Webex for $3.2 Billion Twitter Launches […]

  • March 14, 1994: Apple Power Macintosh
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 14, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1994 – Apple computer released a new line of MacIntosh computers in the Power Macintosh 6100. With a 60-66 MHz PowerPC 601 RISC processor – the first time Apple used this processor line – up to 32 MB of RAM, and options such as a composite and S-Video input/output, along with full 48 kHz 16-bit DAT resolution sound processing, this was the computer for the mulitmedia professional. The basic Power Macintosh 6100 was priced at $2,209 Apple also introduced the Power Macintosh 7100 for $3,379 and the 8100  with a 68LC040 emulation ROM for $4,869 It was codename: Piltdown Man Microsoft... […]

  • March 13, 2013: Zuckerberg Calls President Obama
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 13, 2019 at 2:00 am

    2014 – Mark Zuckerberg told the press he called President Barak Obama to bring his concerns to the table. The Facebook post talked about trust on the Internet, keeping it a shared space and how we should work together to create a secure environment. “I’ve called President Obama to express my frustration over the damage the government is creating for all of our future. Unfortunately, it seems like it will take a very long time for true full reform.” The NSA stated they do not use their technical abilities to impersonate US company websites. The refuted all reports. Post by Mark... […]

  • March 12, 1998: V-Chip Becomes Mandatory
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 12, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1998 –  The FCC announced they have come to a finalization on the video programming rating system and have fulfilled all requirements for the proposed “V-Chip”. Along with NAB, NCTA and MPAA, the chip will follow the TV Parental Guidelines and each program will be rated as follows: TV-Y (All Children — This program is designed to be appropriate for all children.) Whether animated or live-action, the themes and elements in this program are specifically designed for a very young audience, including children from ages 2-6. This program is not expected to frighten younger children. TV-Y7 (Directed to Older Children — This program... […]

  • March 11, 2007: The Move of Daylight Savings Time
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 11, 2019 at 2:00 am

    2007 – The Energy Policy Act of 2005 ammended Daylight savings time 3 weeks . The theory was to move clocks forward 1 hour 3 weeks earlier than usual and Fall back in the first week of November (instead of last week in October). From a previous study, it was concluded this change would save households 1% of energy each day of DST. The history of Daylight Savings Time dates back to Benjamin Franklin. He noticed people had their shutters closed to keep out the morning sun, then burned more candles in the evening. Through time he convinced others to change the... […]

  • March 10, 2002: Sony Clié Announced
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 10, 2019 at 2:00 am

    2003 – The Sony Clié PEG-NR70 and PEG-NR70V handheld computers were released. These were 66 MHz PDA units running the Motorola Dragonball SuperVZ processor with a 16-bit color screen and running Palm OS 4.1. The devices would go on sale on April 13, 2002 for $600 Richard D Kenadek is sentenced in the Davy Jones Locker BBS case Gene Roddenberry’s ashes are launched into space Google releases Android 1.1 […]

  • March 9, 2008: The Zuckerberg, Lacy Incident
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 9, 2019 at 2:00 am

    2008 – SXSW Interactive keynote, Mark Zuckerberg was being interviewed by journalist Sarah Lacy. There was a lot of anticipation for the event, but things went south quickly (no pun intended). During the interview, Lacy starts talking about these books Zuckerberg writes into but never formally asked him about it. She gets a little befuddled because Mark was not picking up the ball. She verbally notes the stall, which Zuckerberg replies “You have to ask a question.”  That brought the audience into the conversation with a standing ovation. Trying to continue, Lacy finally made a question out of this story with Mark... […]

  • March 8, 2000: Apple Settles with Daewoo, eMachines over iMac Look
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 8, 2019 at 2:00 am

    2000 – Apple concluded their iMac trade dress infringement against Daewoo and eMachines. The two companies made machines too similar to the iconic iMac look – the eMachines eOne computer and the Daewoo E-Power. Apple was granted an injunction for the two machines. Daewoo didn’t even get their unibody computer form out to the public. eMachines took out all color, making it a single grey computer, which allowed them to continue with sales. Apple changed the look of the iMac with the introduction of a flat panel in the iMac G4, ultimately discontinuing the G3 CRT computer in March of 2003. Sierra... […]

  • March 7, 1996: Pluto Photos Released
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 7, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1996 – Even though Pluto was first seen in 1930, we didn’t have the ability to take a decent picture of the furthest planet… er… dwarf planet… er… (dang you Neil deGrasse Tyson!!!). The Hubble telescope finally was powerful enough to take photos of Pluto’s surface. They spent over 6 days taking snapshots and learning all about this distant neighbor. Astronomers found that Pluto had a complex surface, just like Earth. Many basins and craters were discovered during that six day photo session. Richard Wittman Jr. admits breaking into NASA Sony announces release of Linux development kit for Playstation 2 Intel gives... […]

  • March 6, 1986: First Computer Sting Operation
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 6, 2019 at 2:00 am

    EDITOR NOTE: I received documentation that shows this event actually happened on March 5th. This will be corrected on Wikazine.com and changed for next year. 1986 –  Fremont, California police set up a BBS called “Phoenix Fortress” in order to do one thing – catch cyber criminals. Sgt. Dan Pasquale was the online contact with the handle “Revenger”. He continued to stay in contact with hundreds of of hackers and pirates in seven states through the BBS until they collected enough information to make an arrest. Stolen credit card numbers, long distance codes, selling weapons, hacking information and more were... […]

  • March 5, 1981: Timex Sinclair ZX81 launched
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 5, 2019 at 2:01 am

    1981 – The successor to the Sinclair ZX80, Britain’s most popular home computer – the Sinclair ZX81 was launched by Sinclair Research – a Timex Corporation. It was a popular computer mostly because of the price – £69.95 ($99) or £49.95 in kit form. The cheap computer had only a fraction of components that an Apple II did. Yet the Apple II was around £699. The Sinclair ZX81 only had 1 kB RAM with option to upgrade to 16 kB. The graphics were only in monochrome and the Z80 CPU ran at 3.25 MHz – 8-bit. This was actually faster than the Apple II processor... […]

  • March 4, 2000: Sony Playstation 2 Released
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 4, 2019 at 2:00 am

    2000 – The Playstation 2 was released in Japan to rival Sega’s Dreamcast system and Nintendo Game Cube. The Playstation 2 had an “Emotion Engine” processor at 294 MHz (later 299 MHz with 128 bit capabilities), 32 MB RAMBUS memory, Graphics synth at 147 MHz, USB 1.1, Ethernet connection and 2 memory card slots which could accept up to 8 MB cards. The Sony Playstation 2 didn’t hit the US market until October, 2000. Some say PS2 caused Dreamcast to falter and eventually close down. Many believed this was because the PS2 was backwards compatible with games from the original Playstation.... […]

  • March 3, 1972: Pioneer 10 Launches
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 3, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1972 – NASA launched the Pioneer 10 (a.k.a. Pioneer F) from Cape Canaveral, FL. This was the first spacecraft to traverse an astroid belt. The craft collected the environmental information around Jupiter. This included solar wind, cosmic rays and other events. Pioneer 10 successfully reached Jupiter in November 1973. It took 60 days to collect multiple pieces of information as the craft was in range of the planet. It continued on an unknown journey – passing Saturn in 1976, Uranus in 1979 and Neptune in 1983. The craft continued to send data even after the mission had officially ended in 1997. In... […]

  • March 2, 1995: Delphi Released
    by Jeffrey Powers on March 2, 2019 at 2:00 am

    1995 – Programming language Delphi was released by Borland. Delphi is an object oriented derivative of the Pascal programming language meant for Windos and Mac OS in 32-bit and 64-bit. It was the successor to Borland Pascal. Delphi is still in release – XE7. It has ported over to current desktop and mobile devices including Android devices. Software such as Oracle SQL Developer, MySQL Admin tools, Skype, WinRAR, Nero Burning Rom, Partition Magic, Media Monkey, Ultimate Paint, Age of Wonders and multiple emulators were all written on Delphi at one point in time. Delphi is first released by Borland Yahoo! is... […]