Tech history

  • July 23, 1886: First Car Ever,1903: First Model A Seventeen Years Later
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 23, 2018 at 5:01 am

    Back in 1886, Gottlieb Daimler gets into his new invention. It looks like a horse-drawn buggy, but it has a one cylinder 1.1 HP engine mounted in the back seat. The first car got up to 16 km/h Seventeen years later, in 1903, Ford Motor company sells it’s first car. A Model A to Dr. Ernst Pfenning of Chicago. It was a twin cylindar combustion engine. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 23 IBM goes Open-Source Palm launches the Tungston T2 Commodore unveils the Amiga 1000 […]

  • July 22, 1988: Arrests of Fry Guy, Atlanta Three, Legion of Doom
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 22, 2018 at 10:05 pm

    The Secret Service made some major breakthroughs in Hacking circles in 1989 as three members of the Legion of Doom were arrested. They were charged with hacking into Bell South’s Telephone Networks in 1988. Franklin Darden, Adam grant and Robert Riggs would be sentenced to time in Federal prison. The Secret Service also find out who “Fry Guy” is – the employee who hacked McDonalds mainframe for raises. It was part of the “Hacker Crackdown”. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 22 Mac OS 8.0 is released Bill Gates and Paul Allen sign the MITS agreement Amazon... […]

  • July 21, 1925: John Scopes Guilty on Teaching Evolution
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 21, 2018 at 5:18 pm

    John Scopes was an activist and a teacher. In what was called the “Scopes Monkey Trial“, John was charged on May 5th, 1925 of teaching evolution in his Tennessee classroom. On July 21 he was found guilty and fined $100. The central argument in the case was the Butler Act, prohibiting that human evolution, or any Biblical account of origin could be taught.Scopes verdict was overturned, but only because of a technicality. The Judge fined Scopes and not a jury. The Butler Act was repealed in 1967. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 21 Xerox leaves the computer market... […]

  • July 20 1999: Y2K Act Gives Government Protection
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 20, 2018 at 1:17 am

    2012 – At the premier of the Dark Knight Rises in Aurora, CO. James Eagan Holmes opened fire in one of the theaters. Holmes killed 20 people and injured many. He is currently being evaluated for insanity with a court date of Feb 13, 2014. In a step to protect companies from any post Y2K problems, in 1999, President Bill Clinton signs a bill into law protecting companies from legal action. Today I have signed into law H.R. 775, the “Y2K Act.” This is extraordinary, time-limited legislation designed to deal with an exceptional and unique circumstance of national significance—the Y2K... […]

  • July 19, 2000: Apple PowerMac G4 Cube
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 19, 2018 at 5:01 am

    Apple released a series of new items in 2000, including a new “button less” mouse, iMovie2 and the iMac DV series with the PowerPC G3 processor. But they also introduced the PowerMac G4 Cube – a 450 or 500 MHz computer with Velocity Engine – A Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) which operates concurrently with existing integer and floating-point. Add with it 2 Firewire ports, 10/100BaseT Ethernet, Modem and 20 GB hard drive and you had a serious system at the time. The cube could not take cards because of it’s case sizes and the DVD drive was located on the top... […]

  • July 19
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 19, 2018 at 4:00 am

    This is a duplicate post to serve as a test. […]

  • July 18, 1968: Intel Incorporates
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 18, 2018 at 5:01 am

    Hungarian immigrant Andy Grove, along with Gordon Moore and Robert Noyce founded Intel in 1968, as Integrated Electronics Corporation. Intel was actually the trademark of a hotel – They ended up buying out the name. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 17 The Dark Knight, Heath Ledger’s last movie, hits theaters Video of Titanic’s remains were released US DOC permit’s export of computers to the Soviet Union […]

  • July 17, 1955: First Town Run on Nuclear Power
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 17, 2018 at 12:28 pm

    During a one-hour test in 1955, Arco, Idaho became the first town to be fully electrically run on nuclear power. The small community was powered by the National Reactor Testing Station” (NRTS). NTRS later became the Idaho National Laboratory. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 17 Apple redesigns the iMac, 20 GB iPod Accenture purchases Symbian Professional Services […]

  • July 16, 1995: Amazon Goes Online, Happy Birthday Orville Redenbacker
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 16, 2018 at 5:01 am

    Fluid Concepts & Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought. That was the first book Amazon sold on July 16th, 1995. The company ran from their garage in Bellevue, Washington. 3 SPARC machines was all they had and a cool little mechanism that rung a bell every time a book was sold. The business model was set to make profit in 5 years. It was a good thing, because that may have helped it survive the dot com bubble. 17 years later, Amazon is going strong. Purchases of companies like WOOT! and Zappos!, along with the introduction... […]

  • July 15, 2006: Twitter Launches,1928: Enigma Machine Introduced
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 15, 2018 at 5:01 am

    2006 – Biz Stone, Jack Dorsey, Noah Glass and Evan Williams launch this 140 character “What are you doing” social network. The group first started production in March of 2006, but it launched on the 15th. Currently, over 200 million users are on Twitter. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 15 Microsoft releases C# iTunes 8.2.1 blocks Palm Pre Nintendo launches the “Famicon” “Gangnam Style” by Psy releases The Enigma machine was the first electronic cipher machines, producing encrypted messages. German engineer Arthur Scherbius created this device in 1928 to turn a message into a jumble of code. Therefore, if the message got in... […]

  • July 14, 2011: Spotify Comes to the US
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 14, 2018 at 5:01 am

    2011 – The US waited for this Swedish music streaming service, and on this day, we got it. Founded in 2006, Spotify announced after exhaustive negotiation with four major US record labels, they were given the green light to launch. It came with much praise from the online community. Since then, Spotify was integrated with Facebook, and launched their own apps and app finder. Meanwhile, in 1995, after 15 million lines and 3 years of programming,Microsoft announces Windows 95 (a.k.a. Chicago) was deemed “Golden“.That meant Microsoft could not make any more fixes or adjustments would be made until it’s release on August... […]

  • July 13, 2011: Netflix Splits DVD – Streaming
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 13, 2018 at 5:01 am

    2011 – CEO Reed Hastings announced a bombshell that, in turn, brought on Netflix’s single worst year ever. He announced that they were splitting Netflix streaming from DVD rentals. With that, the price would be doubled – $8 for 2 DVD rental plan and $8 for streaming. If you were an existing customer, you would be grandfathered in until September. This news caused their stock to fall, which continued when Hastings announced the DVD division was to be rebranded as Qwikster, and sold (which, of course, didn’t happen). 1923 – HollywoodLand Sign is dedicated to the people in Los Angeles CA. The... […]

  • July 12, 1960: Etch A Sketch Debuts
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 12, 2018 at 5:01 am

    It is the famous drawing tool that became a cult classic. A toy that is as collectable as the LEGO or Star Wars memorabilia. The Etch A Sketch was first brought out on shelves in 1960. Of course, since then it has taken its popularity to many levels. Some people create masterpieces, while others just play with the dials. I have an Etch A Sketch attached to a pencil, but its size is about the same as an iPad or other Tablet. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 12 IBM 3663 released Atari is approved to merge with... […]

  • July 11, 2007: Oracle 11g
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 11, 2018 at 5:01 am

    2007 – Oracle releases what they called the $10 billion / year Database software in Oracle 11g. It was the first update since 2004. Oracle’s what as refered to as an object-relational database management system (ORDBMS). It is produced and marketed by Oracle Corporation. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 11 1969 – David Bowie releases Space Oddity 1987 – World population hits 5 billion 1991 – the Eclipse of the Century 2005 – PowerPC 970MP 2008 – iPhone 3G goes on sa […]

  • July 10, 1981: Black Wednesday to Apple
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 10, 2018 at 5:01 am

    No, this isn’t a case of the office and this is not how Michael Scott  (Steve Carell) leaves the show… In a case that was refered as “Black Wednesday”, CEO Michael Scott felt that there was a lot of redundancy. Therefore he decided to fire 40 employees, including half of the Apple II engineering team. The move caused Apple to replace Scott almost imediately. On July 10, 1981, Scott officially resigned from Apple stating that this was a “Learning experience” for him. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 10 Mel Blanc, the major voice of Looney Tunes... […]

  • July 9, 1982: Tron Movie and Video Game Released
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 9, 2018 at 5:01 am

    It was a movie that became a cult classic. Tron – The story of Kevin Flynn who tries to figure out if ENCOM stole his game ideas. While hacking into the mainframe, the company sets a trap where Flynn gets sucked into the video game. The movie debuted in 1982 along with the video game by Bally. Tron starred Jeff Bridges, Bruce Boxleitner and Cindy Morgan. It took 17 million to make the movie, it grossed 33 million in return. Tron’s sequel of sorts – called Legacy – was released on Dec 17, 2010.  Unfortunately, it did not receive the same status as the original did. Full... […]

  • July 8, 2007: The Big DNS Flaw, 1881 Ice Cream Sundae Created
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 8, 2018 at 5:30 am

    In 2007, developer Dan Kaminsky found a flaw in the addressing of the Domain Name System, or DNS. DNS is found on home to commercial routers around the world. The issue was so severe, that they were not divulging the issue until a patch could be implemented on a wide scale. On March 31st, Kaminsky – along with 16 other developers – gathered at Microsoft to work on a massive patch and synchronize the release so all details could be released as well. The Patch was released in July 8th, 2008. For more information, see the Explaination of the DNS Flaw Full... […]

  • July 7, 1994: I3enc Released (a.k.a. MP3)
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 7, 2018 at 5:01 am

    1994 – The Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits (IIS) released I3enc – otherwise known at MP3. This is also known as MPEG-3. The MP3 moniker did not get chosen until July 14, 1995 (it was .bit before .mp3). MP3 is still licensed to Fraunhofer Institute – therefore, you must pay a license fee to use the popular .mp3 format. There is an open source format .ogg vorbis. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 7 PSOne is released TI-99/4a is demonstrated on the Mike Douglas Show A Legal version of Scrabble hits Facebook […]

  • July 6, 1984: Jack Tramiel Fired Atari Staff
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 6, 2018 at 5:01 am

    In a very bold move, Jack Tramiel laid off the majority of his staff outside of engineering. This comes in 1984, 3 days after Tramiel buys Atari for $240 million in 10 and 12 year notes. The employees note that it wasn’t a Hard layoff. One employee stated that no one cared if they looted the building, so they did. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 6 ABC joins Hulu Microsoft’s first corporate president Source code of e-mule was released […]

  • July 5, 1937: SPAM (The Luncheon Meat) is Introduced
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 5, 2018 at 5:01 am

    Not the email version. In 1937, Hormel came out with the first can of SPAM. The Luncheon meat. Spam was derived from the words Spiced Ham. It is pre-cooked meat that contained chopped pork, ham mean, salt, water, potato starch, and sodium nitrate. So if you have high blood pressure, you might want to stay away from this stuff. Spam comes in many varieties, including Hot & Spicy, Less sodium (25%), Spam Lite, Oven Roasted Turkey, and others. SPAM is made in SpamTown, USA – or Austin, Minnesota. McDonalds uses Spam in Guam, hawaii and Saipan. Spam is known as... […]

  • July 4, 1996: Microsoft Hotmail Independence Day Launch
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 4, 2018 at 5:01 am

    “Happy Independence Day. In return, we are going to give you a great new way to get email. It’s called “Hotmail“. Be free from your internet service provider!” That was the call to action on 1996. Hotmail launched their email service as “HoTMaiL” (HTML is upper-case). It is the first web-based email that was later named MSN Hotmail, then Windows Live Hotmail. Hotmail had many features since its start. Unlimited storage was one big feature. In 1997, Microsoft purchased Hotmail for $400 million, and changed the name to MSN Hotmail. They paired with the Microsoft Instant Messanger, then built items... […]

  • July 3, 1991: Apple, IBM Create Pact on Power PC Mac
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 3, 2018 at 5:01 am

    1991 – IBM’s Jim Cannavino met with John Sculley of Apple. They worked out a deal and signed a sharing agreement. It would allow Mac to integrate with IBM enterprise systems. It would also allow Apple to use the PowerPC with their RISC based Mac to work together.Power PC stands for Performance Optimization with Enhanced RISC. It is also known as PPC. The RISC architecture processor was first meant for personal computers, yet embedded machines adopted them for use. Computers such as the AmigaOS 4, POSIX, BeOS all used PowerPC. Even Windows machines used PowerPC for their NT 3.51 and... […]

  • July 2, 2001: Napster Shut Down
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 2, 2018 at 5:01 am

    Napster, the file sharing service (started by John & Shawn Fanning, and Sean Parker) that was up since 1999, had a series of trials and tribulations until 2001. After lengthy legal battles with artists like Madonna and Metallica, Napster began to realize their business model is not going to work. They shut down the entire network to comply with an injunction. This case was partially settled on September 24, 2001, where Napster was ordered to pay $26 million in damages and $10 million in future royalties.Eventually, Napster filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, right before Napster 3.0 was ready to be deployed. On... […]

  • July 1, 2011: HP TouchPad, 2000: Trillian, IM2 Released
    by Jeffrey Powers on July 1, 2018 at 5:30 am

    2011 – HP announced the TouchPad, their entry into the tablet market. Using the WebOS software they purchased from Palm back in 2010, the TouchPad introduced some new features, including the ability to sync with the upcoming Pre3 phone by touching the two together. However, the tablet was squashed in September by then CEO Leo Apetheker. Since then, HP abandoned WebOS, making it open source. They have put out another tablet in early 2013 using the Android software. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 1 2000 – Remember the days of the Instant Messenger? Yahoo IM or... […]

  • June 30, 2000: Silicon Microchips beneath Human Retinas
    by Jeffrey Powers on June 30, 2018 at 5:01 am

    2000 – Dr. Alan chow and brother Vincent announced they successfully placed a silicon microchip beneath human retinas. The chip is smaller than the head on a pin and only microns thin. These chips also contain solar cells to help power the chip. In what is called “Optobionics”, the ASR chip is inserted behind the retina in the “subretinal space”. This is a 2 hour procedure and the chip can last up to 8 years after (depending on care). Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 30 IBM unbundles software from Hardware President Bill Clinton e-signs the first bill... […]